Category Archives: New Discoveries

Ancient Sea Monsters: Misidentified Fossilized Skeletons Now Revealing Hidden History of Ichthyosaur

From www.ancient-origins.net | November 2, 2015 The fossilized skeletons of strange creatures—odd, beaked fish with teeth and ‘feet’—were uncovered by quarry workers in southwestern England in the early 1800’s. Dubbed “fish lizards” (or Ichthyosauria) at the time, the old discoveries are now under new examination. These ancient sea monsters, specimens collected from across Europe, are apparently not one animal type, but many different unique species. Resembling a cross between fish and dolphins, ichthyosaurs dominated the […]

Strange New Bat Species Found in Museum Pickle Jar

By Douglas Main | Octobe 31, 2015 In 1983, researcher Charles Francis collected a bat in northeastern Borneo that was brought to London’s Natural History Museum. There, it sat in a pickle jar full of alcohol for three decades. Within the last two years, scientists happened upon it and examined the specimen. After careful work, they determined it represented a new species that hadn’t been described before, and they dubbed it Francis’ woolly horseshoe bat (Rhinolophus […]

Frodo’s basement: Secret chamber found where hobbit humans lived 

By Colin Barras | October 29, 2015 The diminutive human hobbits of Flores had a basement. And early signs hint at the tantalising possibility of more Homo floresiensis bones in this newly discovered chamber. H. floresiensis became a worldwide sensation when it was unveiled a decade ago. The fragile remains in a cave on Flores island in Indonesia told the remarkable story of a tiny species of early human, standing about 1 metre tall. What’s […]

Scuba divers in Bahamas find trove of extinct animal fossils and clues to a scientific mystery

By Joel Acenbach | October 19, 2015 Sawmill Sink is a challenging place to dive. It’s a flooded sinkhole on the island of Abaco in the Bahamas. Below 30 feet is a layer of opaque water saturated in poisonous, acidic hydrogen sulfide. But in 2004, a retired military diver named Brian Kakuk figured out how to penetrate the murk and dive into the lightless depths of the hole. Along ledges, he found a trove of […]

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