Tag Archives: Agriculture | Global

Extinction Means Less Mammal Poop To Fertilize The Earth

By Rebekah Marcarelli | October 26, 2015 New research suggests the loss of mammal poop could mean a more barren Earth. The world relies on the nutrient transfer from animal feces to remain fertile, but new research suggest major species declines and extinctions have put this planetary nutrient recycling system in jeopardy. The weakening of this vital system could have a negative impact on ecosystem health, fisheries, and agriculture, the University of Vermont reported. The researchers calculated …

Otago geologists find new whale species | Radio New Zealand News

From www.radionz.co.nz | September 13, 2015 Fossil discoveries by University of Otago palaeontology researchers have helped fill an important gap in the evolution of baleen whales. In the 1990s, Otago geologists found the fossils in the South Island’s Waitaki River area, and a study about them has just been published in two science journals. One of the lead researchers, Ewan Fordyce, said the fossils show two previously unknown species of filter-feeding baleen whales that lived 25 to 30 …

Smithsonian Science News –Meet the (flea) beetles! New species

By John Barrat | September 3, 2015 Nausea, vomiting and weakness are but a few of the symptoms one might anticipate after eating leaves from the Taiwanese shrub Erycibe henryi. This wild plant produces powerful toxins as a self-defense against herbaceous insects and other creatures that might otherwise feast upon its leaves. Yet one tiny flea beetle has outwitted this poisonous shrub. Meet Burumoseria yuae; it lives and feeds exclusively on E. henryi, gnawing large holes in its toxic leaves. The …

A New Study Reports 99 Percent of Sea Bird Species Could Be Eating Plastic by 2050 – CityLab

By John Metcalfe | September 1, 2015 Plastic—it’s what’s for dinner, tragically, if you happen to be a hungry sea bird. A new study in PNAS estimates nearly 90 percent of all living marine birds have eaten some type of plastic. With concentrations as thick as 580,000 pieces per square kilometer of ocean—and with global plastics manufacturing increasing exponentially—99 percent of seabird species could be ingesting the crud by 2050, say researchers at Australia’s Commonwealth …

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