Tag Archives: genus

New species of cannibal scorpions – Bangalore Mirror

… for Ecological Sciences, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru have described a new species of hormurid scorpion from the Western Ghats of India. A new species of the enigmatic genus Chiromachetes Pocock was spotted in Nov 2013, but the research paper was published in Euscorpius — Occasional Publications in Scorpiology on Tuesday. The new species, Chiromachetes sahyadriensis is named after Sahyadri Hills synonymous to the Western Ghats. Speaking to Bangalore Mirror, Zeeshan Mirza said, …

L.A.’s Back-Yard Entomologists

… patio and some poorly maintained lawn to a lush tropical oasis with swimming pool. The traps were left in place for a calendar year, until late 2014. Within the first three months, Brown and Hartop began to realize that they had hit the phorid jackpot, with a suspected thirty new species of the genus Megaselia. Proving that a fly the size of a sesame seed is sufficiently different from every other fly ever recorded to qualify for species status is no small task. “You have to look through all …

Hard soft coral: New genus and species of ‘living fossil’ octocoral related to blue coral

… hard skeleton, and therefore many have the common name “soft coral”. One exception is the endangered genus Heliopora, known as blue coral, which is found in tropical locations in the Pacific Ocean. Blue coral forms a massive skeleton of aragonite calcium-carbonate. Due to this unique feature, blue corals have long been placed within their own special order inside the octocorals. This new species, named Nanipora kamurai, also has an aragonite calcium-carbonate skeleton, and molecular …

Giant ‘Walking Bat’ Once Prowled Rainforest Floors

… terrestrial mammals. Two of the country’s three known native bat species belong to the Mystacina genus, though one of those species hasn’t been seen since the 1960s. These two modern species are burrowing bats that forage in the air as well as on the ground, looking under the leaf litter and snow for food. They scurry about on their wrists and backward-facing feet, keeping their wings furled as they search for edibles, the researchers said. To continue reading this article, please …

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