Tag Archives: health

Extinction Means Less Mammal Poop To Fertilize The Earth

By Rebekah Marcarelli | October 26, 2015 New research suggests the loss of mammal poop could mean a more barren Earth. The world relies on the nutrient transfer from animal feces to remain fertile, but new research suggest major species declines and extinctions have put this planetary nutrient recycling system in jeopardy. The weakening of this vital system could have a negative impact on ecosystem health, fisheries, and agriculture, the University of Vermont reported. The researchers calculated …

A 21st-century government must care for our nature and our future

… Australia has made something approaching this pledge before. In 1992 the Keating government signed the Convention on Biological Diversity. In doing so, it made a promise (later enshrined in national legislation), that: … the present generation should ensure the health, diversity and productivity of the environment is maintained or enhanced for the benefit of future generations. It is a promise that was not kept by earlier generations of Australians who, through lack of understanding or …

A New Study Reports 99 Percent of Sea Bird Species Could Be Eating Plastic by 2050 – CityLab

… penguins, have plastic in their guts. According to co-author Denise Hardesty, who was also a member of the NCEAS working group, seabirds are excellent indicators of ecosystem health. “Finding such widespread estimates of plastic in seabirds is borne out by some of the fieldwork we’ve carried out where I’ve found nearly 200 pieces of plastic in a single seabird,” she said…. The plethora of plastic comes from bags, bottle caps, and plastic fibers from synthetic clothes that have washed …

Officials to Create ‘Butterfly Highway’ to Save Species | Ecorazzi

… won’t be easy, but we can do it,” stated Director of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Dan Ashe. Monarch butterflies have seen a significant decrease in population in the latest yearswith nearly a billion butterflies gone in the last 25 years, but just like their other quickly vanishing buggy friends, the bees, they are vital for pollination and the health of our ecosystem. Their loss of habitat, according to the national agency, is their main threat. The location for the butterfly corridor …

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